Contextual Fit

All Research

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SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Contextual fit for behavioral support plans: A model for A Goodness-of-fit

Albin and colleagues make the argument that interventions are more likely to be adopted and implemented if they is a good contextual fit between the context of implementation and the intervention.

Albin, R. W., Lucyshyn, L. M., Homer, R. H., & Flannery, K. B. (1996). Contextual fit for behavioral support plans: A model for A Goodness-of-fit. In R. L. K. L. K. Koegel, & G. Dunlap (Eds.), (Ed.), Positiveb ehavior support: Including people with difficult behavior in the community (pp. (pp. 81-89).). Baltimore: Paul Brookes. 

Effects of Behavior Support Team Composition on the Technical Adequacy and Contextual Fit of Behavior Support Plans

Benazzi and colleagues examined the contextual fit of interventions when they were deveopled by different configurations of individuals.

Benazzi, L., Horner, R. H., & Good, R. H. (2006). Effects of Behavior Support Team Composition on the Technical Adequacy and Contextual Fit of Behavior Support Plans. Journal of Special Education, 40(3), 160-170.

Increasing treatment fidelity by matching interventions to contextual variables within the educational setting

The impact of an intervention is influenced by how well it fis into the context of a classroom.  This paper suggests a number of variables to consider and how they might be measured prior to the development of an intervention.

Detrich, R. (1999). Increasing treatment fidelity by matching interventions to contextual variables within the educational setting. School Psychology Review, 28(4), 608-620.

Balancing Fidelity With Flexibility and Fit: What Do We Really Know About Fidelity of Implementation in Schools

This paper suggests a model for selecting interventions that match the context of classrooms.

Harn, B., Parisi, D., & Stoolmiller, M. (2013). Balancing fidelity with flexibility and Fit: What do we really know about fidelity of implementation in schools?. Exceptional Children, 79(2), 181-193.

The importance of contextual fit when implementing evidence-based interventions.

“Contextual fit” is based on the premise that the match between an intervention and local context affects both the quality of intervention implementation and whether the intervention actually produces the desired outcomes for children and families.

Horner, R., Blitz, C., & Ross, S. (2014). The importance of contextual fit when implementing evidence-based interventions. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. https://aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/77066/ib_Contextual.pdf

Using Interventions That Exist in the Natural Environment to Increase Treatment Integrity and Social Influence in Consultation

It is proposed in this paper that interventions are most likely to be implemented when they draw from existing practices in a classroom.

Riley-Tillman, T. C., & Chafouleas, S. M. (2003). Using Interventions That Exist in the Natural Environment to Increase Treatment Integrity and Social Influence in Consultation. Journal of Educational & Psychological Consultation, 14(2), 139-156.

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