Home Schooling

All Research

TITLE
SYNOPSIS
CITATION
Homeschooling in the United States: 1999.

The National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES), 1999, is a telephone survey data collection program conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Based on NCES data, this report provides an estimate of the number of home-schooled students in the United States, characteristics of home-schooled children and their families, parents' reasons for home-schooling, and public school support for home-schoolers.

Bielick, S., Chandler, K., & Broughman, S. P. (2001). Homeschooling in the United States: 1999.

Visible learning

This influential book is the result of 15 years research that includes over 800 meta-analyses on the influences on achievement in school-aged students. This is a great resource for any stakeholder interested in conducting a serious search of evidence behind common models and practices used in schools.

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning. A synthesis of over, 800.

Homeschooling in the United States: 2003. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2006-042

This report represents the latest survey information from the National Center for Education Statistics on the prevalence of homeschooling in the United States. This document uses the Parent and Family Involvement Survey of the 2003 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES) to estimate the number and percentage of homeschooled students in the United States in 2003 and to describe the characteristics of these students and their families.

Princiotta, D., & Bielick, S. (2006). Homeschooling in the United States: 2003. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2006-042. National Center for Education Statistics.

Research Facts on Homeschooling

Homeschooling that a decade ago appeared to be cutting-edge and "alternative" now is bordering on "mainstream" in the United States. This article describes the findings regarding home education: (1) General facts and trends; (2) Reasons for home educating; (3) Academic performance comparisons; (4) Social, emotional, and psychological development; (5) Gender differences in children who are home educated; and (6) Success in the "Real World" of adulthood. Research designs to date do not conclusively "prove" that homeschooling produces superior results or has a negative impact on student achievement.

Ray, B. D. (2015). Research Facts on Homeschooling. National Home Education Research Institute.

Homeschooling in the United States: 2012

The Institute of Educational Sciences released its latest data analysis on homeschooling. It provides statistics on the total number of students being homeschooled, characteristics of homeschooled students, and characteristics of learning with homeschooling.

 

Redford, J., Battle, D., and Bielick, S. (2016). Homeschooling in the United States: 2012 (NCES 2016-096). National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC.

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