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Maternal employment and children's achievement in context: a meta-analysis of four decades of research

This meta-analysis of 68 studies (770 effect sizes) used random effects models to examine whether children's achievement differed depending on whether their mothers were employed.

Goldberg, W. A., Prause, J., Lucas-Thompson, R., & Himsel, A. (2008). Maternal employment and children's achievement in context: a meta-analysis of four decades of research. Psychological bulletin, 134(1), 77.

Home environment and early cognitive development: Longitudinal research

This book presents the results of longitudinal studies in Canada and the United States that looked into the relationship between home environment and early cognitive development.

Gottfried, A. W. (Ed.). (2013). Home environment and early cognitive development: Longitudinal research. Academic Press.

The early catastrophe

In this study, researchers studied the ways in which daily exchanges between a parent and child shape language and vocabulary development. After four years these differences in parent-child interactions produced significant discrepancies in not only children’s knowledge, but also their skills and experiences with children from high-income families being exposed to 30 million more words than children from families on welfare.

Hart, B., & Risley, T. (2003). The early catastrophe. American Educator, 27(4), 6-9.

Visible learning

This influential book is the result of 15 years research that includes over 800 meta-analyses on the influences on achievement in school-aged students. This is a great resource for any stakeholder interested in conducting a serious search of evidence behind common models and practices used in schools.

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning. A synthesis of over, 800.

Visible Learning for Teachers: Maximizing Impact on Learning

This book takes over fifteen years of rigorous research into education practices and provides teachers in training and in-service teachers with concise summaries of the most effective interventions and offers practical guidance to successful implementation in classrooms.

Hattie, J. (2012). Visible learning for teachers: Maximizing impact on learning. Routledge.

Great Myths Of Child Development

Great Myths of Child Development reveals the latest evidence–based science behind the myths and misconceptions about the developing child. The book challenges the most commonly held child development myths. It provides the best available evidence science behind such topical issues as sugar and behavior, antidepressants impact on children, childhood vaccines, spankings, time–out, and children crying before bedtime.

Hupp, S., & Jewell, J. (2015). Great myths of child development. John Wiley & Sons.

Home environment and school learning: A quantitative synthesis

This systematic search of educational, psychological, and sociological literature found 18 studies of 5,831 school-aged students on the correlation of home environment and learning in eight countries over a 19-year period were selected.

Iverson, B. K., & Walberg, H. J. (1982). Home environment and school learning: A quantitative synthesis. The Journal of Experimental Education, 50(3), 144-151.

Family policies and children's school achievement in single‐versus two‐parent families.

This study investigated the gap in math and science achievement of third-and fourth-graders who live with a single parent versus those who live with two parents in 11 countries.

Pong, S. L., Dronkers, J., & Hampden‐Thompson, G. (2003). Family policies and children's school achievement in single‐versus two‐parent families. Journal of marriage and family, 65(3), 681-699.

The complex model of television viewing and educational achievement

Six studies containing data obtained from over 1 million students in elementary, intermediate, and high school were meta-analyzed to examine the relationship between amount of television viewing and educational achievement.

Razel, M. (2001). The complex model of television viewing and educational achievement. The Journal of Educational Research, 94(6), 371-379.

Father Absence, Socioeconomic Status, and Race: Relations to Children's Cognitive Performance.

This meta-analysis looked at socioeconomic status and race statistics to determine whether there were relationships among socioeconomic status, race, and fathers absence from the home. The results of the meta-analysis appear to indicate that father-absence effects are independent of socioeconomic status or race.

Salzman, S. A. (1988). Father Absence, Socioeconomic Status, and Race: Relations to Children's Cognitive Performance.

Kids & Family Reading Report 5th Addition

The Bi-annual Kids & Family Reading Report on the attitudes of children and parents toward reading was released in early January 2016. The latest research touches on reading aloud to children of all ages, the impact of reading independently for fun at school and at home, the importance of frequent reading, and the books children want most to read.

Scholastic. (2015). Kids & Family Reading Report 5th Addition. Scholastic.

Socioeconomic status and academic achievement: A meta-analytic review of research

This meta-analysis reviewed the literature on socioeconomic status (SES) and academic achievement in journal articles published between 1990 and 2000. The results showed a medium to strong SES–achievement relation.

Sirin, S. R. (2005). Socioeconomic status and academic achievement: A meta-analytic review of research. Review of educational research, 75(3), 417-453.

The relation between socioeconomic status and academic achievement

This meta-analysis of almost 200 studies that considered the relation between SES and academic achievement were examined. Results indicated that as SES is typically defined (income, education, and/or occupation of household heads) and typically used (individuals as the unit of analysis), SES is only weakly correlated (r = .22) with academic achievement.

White, K. R. (1982). The relation between socioeconomic status and academic achievement. Psychological bulletin, 91(3), 461.

Are Sleepy Students Learning?

In this article Daniel Willingham tackles the issue of sleep and its impact on learning. This piece examines the available evidence-base on the topic in order to better inform parents and students of the impact of inadequate sleep on academic performance. The typical impact is not devastating, but it is real and the aftermath of cumulative loss of sleep is negative.

Willingham, D. T. (2013). Are Sleepy Students Learning?. American Educator, 36(4), 35-39.

A Parent’s Guide to Response-to-Intervention
This guide provides a description of RTI specifically designed for parents of students with Learning disabilities.
Cortiella, C. (2006). A parent's guide to response-to-intervention. National Center for Learning Disabilities.
The Longitudinal Effects of Kindergarten Enrollment and Relative Age on Children’s Academic Achievement
This research looked at early, on-time, or delayed kindergarten enrollment and children’s mathematics and reading achievement from kindergarten through third grade.
DA?LI, . Y., & Jones, I. (2013). The Longitudinal Effects of Kindergarten Enrollment and Relative Age on Children’s Academic Achievement. Teachers College Record, 115, 030304.
Self-Discipline Outdoes IQ in Predicting Academic Performance of Adolescents
This study examined self-discipline on eighth-grade students and the impact on final grades, school attendance, standardized achievement-test scores, and selection into a competitive high school program the following spring.
Duckworth, A. L., & Seligman, M. E. (2005). Self-discipline outdoes IQ in predicting academic performance of adolescents. Psychological Science, 16(12), 939-944.
Multiple effects of home and daycare crowding.
This research examines the relationship between noise and preschool children's acquisition of prereading skills, environmental factors in preschool inclusive classrooms, and children's use of outdoorplay equipment.
Maxwell, L. E. (1996). Multiple effects of home and day care crowding. Environment and Behavior, 28(4), 494-511.
The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-control.
This book by psychologist Walter Mischel examines delayed gratification through his seminal work known as the �marshmallow test’ and how this factor has been shown to be a reliable predictor of one having a successful life, predicting higher SAT scores, better social and cognitive functioning, a healthier lifestyle and a greater sense of self-worth.
Mischel, W. (2014). The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-control. New York. Little, Brown and Company. 2014.
“Willpower” over the life span: decomposing self-regulation.
This article reviews the longitudinal work derived from the marshmallow test’, originally conducted by Mischel and colleagues, used to measure preschoolers’ ability to delay gratification.
Mischel, W., Ayduk, O., Berman, M. G., Casey, B. J., Gotlib, I. H., Jonides, J., ... & Shoda, Y. (2010). Willpower’over the life span: decomposing self-regulation. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, nsq081.
Evidence-Based Teaching: A Practical Approach
This book offers a thorough array of practical teaching methods backed by rigorous research to have the greatest effect along with practical techniques to apply these in actual classroom settings.
Petty. G. (2009). Evidence-Based Teaching: A Practical Approach. Nelson Thornes, Cheltenham, United Kingdom.
Read To Kids, But Not Necessarily From Birth
This commentary is in response to a recent article in the New York Times suggesting parents should read to their children from birth. Willingham examines the research and offers practical suggestions to parents.
Willingham, D. (2014). Read To Kids, But Not Necessarily From Birth. Daniel Willingham Science and Education Blog.
The Effects of On-time, Delayed and Early Kindergarten Enrollment on Children’s Mathematics Achievement: Differences by Gender, Race, and Family Socio-economic Status
This study examined the effect of delayed, early, and on-time kindergarten enrollment on children's kindergarten mathematics achievement the impact of the children's gender, race, and family SES status.
Yesil Dagli, U., & Jones, I. (2012). The Effects of On-Time, Delayed and Early Kindergarten Enrollment on Children's Mathematics Achievement: Differences by Gender, Race, and Family Socio-Economic Status. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice, 12(4), 3061-3074.
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